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Exploring One Health

Meet the Exploring One Health (EOH) Experts!


One Health Foundations Speakers  

Jane Parmley

Dr. Jane Parmley is an Associate Professor in the Department of Population Medicine at the University of Guelph. She trained as a veterinarian at the University of Saskatchewan and has a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Guelph. Throughout her career, Jane has worked on complex but fascinating health problems such as antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and emerging zoonotic diseases with government, non-governmental and university-based organizations. Using a One Health approach in her research, Jane uses systems thinking to consider the many drivers that influence health and the interconnections between humans, animals and our shared ecosystems, and collaborates with other disciplinary experts to find creative solutions to complex health problems.

Katie Clow

Dr. Katie Clow is an Assistant Professor in One Health in the Department of Population Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph. Her research focuses on the ecology and epidemiology of vectors and vector-borne zoonoses, with a specific emphasis on the blacklegged tick and Lyme disease. She also conducts research more broadly on One Health, including pedagogy and community-level applications. She holds both a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree (OVC, 2011) and PhD (Pathobiology, 2017). Dr. Clow has worked in private small animal practice as well as at the national and international level in One Health through internships at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Department of Food Safety, Zoonoses and Foodborne Disease at the World Health Organization, and the Global Disease Detection Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She is a member of the Canadian Lyme Disease Research Network, and regularly collaborates with public health professionals and veterinarians in private practice and industry.

Ali Halajian

Dr. Ali Halajian was born in northern Iran, did Veterinary medicine and PhD in Veterinary Parasitology in Iran. After research visits to Bulgaria and Italy he joined University of Limpopo, South Africa, first as Post doctoral fellow (2011-2015) and then from 2016 a senior researcher at DST-NRF SARChI chair in Ecosystem Health.


He has authored or co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed publications and around 50 congress presentations, national and international. He has contributed to the field of parasitology and science as a whole, having described 12 new species of organisms (11 of them parasites), 8 from South Africa, from different hosts and supervising students at different levels. In 2015, the University of Limpopo awarded him the Best Overall Upcoming Researcher of the university and in 2018 as the Best Established Researcher in the School of Molecular and Life Sciences.

Beside all academic research, he loves science communication and has been involved with various activities like managing a volunteering program at SARChI parasitology laboratory (University of Limpopo), giving science presentations at local schools, using science art as a platform of teaching at schools, science talks at a local community radio, judging at science fairs (e.g. Tritech and Eskom expo), mentoring pupils, students and junior farmers through different platforms (e.g. GreenMatter, ISOHA, Sizanani Mentorship programme) and being active in local NGOs (e.g. FrOHG).


He is currently research associate at University of Limpopo and technical specialist at Elanco Animal Health and his fields of interest are one health, animal health and zoonotic diseases.

Travis Steffens

Dr. Travis Steffens is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Guelph. His research focuses on lemur-human interactions within shared environments, including how lemurs interact and respond to human-caused disturbances, and how humans are in –turn impacted by conservation measures for lemurs and their habitat. He is also the Founder and Executive Director of Planet Madagascar. Planet Madagascar is a conservation, education, and community development not-for-profit organization that works closely with local communities to improve the lives of people who live in Madagascar and to conserve lemurs and their habitat.

Cheryl Stroud

Dr. Cheryl Stroud has enjoyed professional experiences in Industry, Academic Research / Teaching, Private Veterinary Practice and as a One Health practitioner. In 2010 she was instrumental in creating the North Carolina One Health Collaborative, Chairing its Steering Committee for over three years and facilitating collaborative formation of an interinstitutional One Health course, One Health:  Philosophy to Practical Integration of Human, Animal and Environmental Health, cross-listed at Duke, UNC and NC State.

Currently as Executive Director of the One Health Commission Dr. Stroud’s primary focus is educating, locally, nationally and globally, about the urgent need for One Health implementation. She shares the concept and updates about the global One Health movement with audiences around the world seeking to connect One Health stakeholders into Action Teams, strategic networks and partnerships that can educate about the full scope of and critical need for One Health thinking and acting.

Dr. Cheryl Stroud has enjoyed professional experiences in Industry, Academic Research / Teaching, Private Veterinary Practice and as a One Health practitioner. In 2010 she was instrumental in creating the North Carolina One Health Collaborative, Chairing its Steering Committee for over three years and facilitating collaborative formation of an interinstitutional One Health course, One Health:  Philosophy to Practical Integration of Human, Animal and Environmental Health, cross-listed at Duke, UNC and NC State.

Currently as Executive Director of the One Health Commission Dr. Stroud’s primary focus is educating, locally, nationally and globally, about the urgent need for One Health implementation. She shares the concept and updates about the global One Health movement with audiences around the world seeking to connect One Health stakeholders into Action Teams, strategic networks and partnerships that can educate about the full scope of and critical need for One Health thinking and acting.

Graham Taylor

Description coming soon!

Nikola May

Hello everyone! My name is Nikola May (she/her) and I am the Junior Lead of the Networking and Student Engagement team. I am currently a second year MSc student in the department of Pathobiology with a collaborative specialization in One Health. One of my favorite things about One Health is the importance of collaboration, which I believe will be vital to approaching the complex issues we are facing today. I am personally interested in how a One Health approach can be used to improve food safety and security. I’m very excited to see the future of One Health research!

Carrie McMullen

Hello! I’m Carrie McMullen (she/her) – the Communications Lead for OHSC. I am a first year PhD student in Population Medicine and the Collaborative Specialization in One Health. I started with OHSC in September of 2020, and our Communications Team is responsible for overseeing the Instagram account and creating some of the fun initiatives you have seen on this profile so far! I want to continue to develop my skills as a One Health practitioner so I can advocate for the health of ALL beings and ecosystems. I certainly can’t wait to be back snowboarding or playing volleyball when it is safe to do so!

Sydney Pearce

Hi everyone, my name is Sydney Pearce (she/her) and I’m the OHSC President! I founded OHSC back in fall 2019 and I’m doing my PhD in the Department of Population Medicine with the Collaborative Specialization in One Health. I’m passionate about One Health because its holistic, transdisciplinary nature can empower us to tackle many pressing issues affecting health, from climate change to food security, and encourages us to better understand and address the impact of inequities through research, practice, and advocacy. I also love that it allows me to engage with diverse communities and listen to so many important perspectives – it lets me explore fields that I didn’t go into but enjoy learning about! A fun fact about me is that I was on one of the U of G dance teams and cheer team (and *try to keep active with a local dance troupe online)! 

Coming soon…

Dr. Samira Mubareka

Dr. Marc Habash


One Health Expert Q&A Panelists  

Susan Cork

I am currently a professor in Ecosystem and Public Health at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. I joined the faculty in 2008 as founding Head of the Department of Ecosystem and Public Health. Prior to arriving in Canada, I spent five years with the New Zealand Ministry of Agriculture & Forestry where I held a number of science, policy and management positions. I completed my Veterinary degree (Massey University, New Zealand) in 1987 and my first job after graduating was with the Society for the Protection of Cruelty to Animals on the Pacific Island of Fiji. Subsequently, I worked in private veterinary practice in the United Kingdom before returning to New Zealand to complete a PhD. During my PhD I provided diagnostic support for wildlife in partnership with the New Zealand Department of Conservation. In 1995 I took the opportunity to travel to Asia where I subsequently accepted the position of veterinary laboratory manager in Eastern Bhutan, this was part of a European Union funded project to strengthen veterinary services in Asia. In 2003, after 6 years in the UK working in academia, I returned to New Zealand to join Government Service and obtained a Diploma in Public Policy from the School of Government, Victoria University, Wellington. Since then I have returned to Bhutan a number of times and completed a 6-month sabbatical at the National Centre for Animal Health in 2014. My research interests are in global health, animal health policy, veterinary public health and wildlife diseases. Recent research projects in which we used a One Health approach include: exploring policy options to prevent rabies in Cattle in Bhutan, the epidemiology of tuberculosis in elephants in India and several projects on climate change, ticks and tick borne diseases. Outside of work I love to travel and I have explored many parts of Africa, Asia, Central America and the Middle East to experience other cultures and to photograph people, landscapes and wildlife.

https://vet.ucalgary.ca/contact-us/susan-cork

Ellena Andoniou

Dr. Ellena Andoniou has 13 years’ experience working in the African context, and it began with her Masters work exploring sexual behavior change in the context of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria.  Her first in-field experience came when she first served as a Western Heads East (WHE) intern in Mwanza, Tanzania – the project is Western’s community response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa.  Her work focused on this global health and community development project which is a research and service-learning program that partners with women’s groups in East Africa to introduce probiotic yogurt to help address the health, social, and economic impacts of the illness.  From 2016 – 2020 her work focused on a health systems project aimed at improving maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) funded by Global Affairs Canada.  

Ellena has extensive in-field experience from managing projects in Tanzania, Kenya, South Africa, and Rwanda. Her research and professional collaborations have allowed her to work closely with community members, the National Institute for Medical Research in Tanzania, The Kenya Medical Research Institute, and other development and health-care organizations in the region.  

Dr Andoniou is now part of the One Health team, at Western University where they are currently exploring community health worker’s experiences as agents of behaviour change in the context of human and zoonotic tuberculosis through a One Health approach. 

Michelle Lem

Dr. Michelle Lem graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) in 2001, and founded Community Veterinary Outreach in 2003, a registered charity that improves the health of homeless individuals and their pets through a “One Health” model of care. By offering human health services and health education alongside preventative veterinary care, Community Veterinary Outreach was the first of its kind to provide innovative access to both veterinary and human health care for at-risk populations. Community Veterinary Outreach has programs in 5 communities in Ontario, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Vancouver, Kelowna, Canada, and Kansas City, USA (Community Veterinary Outreach USA). 

After graduating from OVC, Michelle practiced on the North Island of New Zealand before returning to Ottawa, where she has practiced companion animal medicine and surgery as an associate veterinarian, companion animal mobile service and locum. From 2003 to 2009, Michelle provided behavioural consultations for companion animals on a referral basis; consulted for police canine units, was contracted by the Department of National Defence (military working dog program) from 2009 till 2011; and taught in the Veterinary Assistant and Technician programs at Algonquin College from 2004 till 2014. 

In 2009, Michelle received an OVC fellowship to pursue graduate research in the Department of Population Medicine, studying the effects of pet ownership on street-involved youth, receiving her MSc in 2012. This research has been published in peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Anthrozoös and the Canadian Veterinary Journal. Michelle authored a chapter on street-involved youth for the 2016 Springer Publication “Men and Their Dogs: A New Understanding of ‘Man’s Best Friend”, and co-authored publications in the Canadian Veterinary Journal, Canadian Journal of Public Health, Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, and Animals (open access). Michelle speaks internationally on Community Veterinary Outreach’s One Health model of community care.  

Michelle has served on the College of Veterinarians of Ontario’s Shelter Medicine Task Force, is an active member of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) as a trained member of the Canadian Veterinary Reserve and served on CVMA’s Animal Welfare Committee from 2013 to 2018.  

In 2018 Michelle received her Master of Social Work from Carleton University. Her areas of interest for her MSW were the link between human and animal violence, pet ownership among marginalized populations, wellbeing in the veterinary profession, and One Health approaches to intervention and practice. Michelle is currently in private social work practice in addition to working on projects including the development of Animal Care Guidelines for Emergency Co-Sheltering and the Risk Assessment for Companion Animals in Domestic Violence. 

Michelle was elected an Ashoka fellow for her social innovation in accessible health care for marginalized populations and has received numerous awards including the Summit for Urban Animal Strategies’ Individual Achievement Award and Community Collaboration Award, the OVC Young Alumnus Award, The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Award and the CVMA’s Presidents Award. Michelle was the recipient of the 2019 World Small Animal Veterinary Association’s Global One Health Award. 

Michelle Grundahl

Michelle is a graduate student in the Master of Biodefense program at George Mason University, Schar School of Policy and Government. Her interest is the interface of One Health and Biodefense. A few special interests include global health security (health systems preparedness, zoonotic emerging infectious diseases), bioterrorism, agroterrorism, food security, and biosecurity. She has been managing animal disaster planning in the Pennsylvania Animal Response Team, and for the Philadelphia UASI region’s Southeastern Pennsylvania Regional Task Force (SEPA RTF) Health and Human Services (HHS) Mass Care group for the past decade. Michelle earned her BS in Animal Science (Animal Biotechnology) in 2002 from Delaware Valley University (Cum Laude). Since then, she has been employed in the contract research (CRO) industry providing business development (pharmaceutical/biotech/chemical/agriculture) and drug development services for preclinical animal toxicology and human clinical trials.

David Waltner-Toews

Dr. David Waltner-Toews is a University Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph (Department of Population Medicine). He was founding president of Veterinarians without Borders/ Vétérinaires sans Frontières – Canada (www.vwb-vsf.ca), a founding member of VSF-International, and a founding member of Communities of Practice for Ecosystem Approaches to Health in Canada (www.copeh-canada.org) and internationally. He has worked on every continent except Antarctica on one health and ecosystem approaches to health. In 2010, in London, England, the International Association for Ecology and Health presented him with the inaugural award for contributions to ecosystem approaches to health, and in 2019 he received an award from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association recognizing “veterinarians who have exhibited exceptional acts of valour and commitment in the face of adversity to service the community.”

Scholarly books he has authored or co-authored include Ecosystem Sustainability and Health: a practical approach (2004), The Ecosystem Approach: Complexity, Uncertainty, and Managing for Sustainability, and Integrated Assessment of Health and Sustainability of Agroecosytems (2008). He co-edited and co-wrote several chapters in the first edition of One Health: The Theory and Practice of Integrated Health. eds Zinsstag J, Schelling E, Waltner-Toews D, Whittaker M, Tanner M. Eds. 2015, and Independent Thinking in an Uncertain World, eds. Valerie A. Brown, John A. Harris, and David Waltner-Toews. (2019).

Besides being an author or co-author of scholarly books and more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, he has published six books of poetry, a collection of recipes and dramatic monologues, an award-winning collection of short stories, two murder mysteries, and various books of popular science including On Pandemics: Deadly Diseases from Bubonic Plague to Coronavirus (2020); The Origin of Feces: what excrement tells us about evolution, ecology and a sustainable society (2013); Eat the Beetles: an exploration into our conflicted relationship with insects (2017); and Food, Sex and Salmonella: why our food is making us sick (2008).


One Health Institute and One Health Faculty Meet & Greets

Robyn Meerveld

Robyn Meerveld is a Guelph grad from the College of Biological Sciences and has come back to the U of G after a long career with OMAFRA and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

As a field biologist, research analyst and research editor, she’s not sure who makes the best colleagues – two legged or four, but she’s been happy working with both.

Lately she’s been inspired by a variety of freelance projects – for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers, and U of G’s Office of Research.

With stints in government, academia and industry, Robyn says she looks at the world from 30,000 feet (9144 meters) and can see how each of them fit together, in the same way that humans, animals and the environment are so intrinsically linked in their relationship with one other.

No surprise she’s enthused about working at Guelph’s One Health Institute.

When she’s not reading her favourite science and news magazines, Robyn loves scuba diving in warm, clear waters and skiing at her cottage.

Lawrence Goodridge

After completing a B.Sc. Honours degree in Microbiology at the University of Guelph, Dr. Lawrence Goodridge completed both his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Food Science with an emphasis on microbial detection of foodborne pathogens, also at Guelph, before leaving for a Postdoctoral Fellowship to continue his training in microbial food safety in the laboratory of Dr. Michael Doyle in the Center for Food Safety at the University of Georgia. Prior to returning to Guelph, Lawrence has held faculty positions at the University of Wyoming and Colorado State University. More recently, he was the Ian and Jayne Munro Chair in Food Safety in the Food Science Department at McGill University. In January, 2019, Lawrence joined the Department of Food Science as Director of the Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, where he holds the Leung Family Professorship in Food Safety, and directs the Food Safety and Quality Assurance Program.  Dr. Goodridge conducts research related to control and detection of pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, viruses and parasites. Dr. Goodridge has published more than 95 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and has been awarded more than $25 million in research funding from US, Canadian and international funding sources.

Brian Husband

Dr. Husband is a Professor of Integrative Biology and the Associate Dean Academic for the College of Biological Science. His recent research relates to a One Health perspective through the sustainability of food production through and the interactions between domesticated crops and native ecosystems. For the last 1.5 years, he has served as Chairperson of the development committee for the One Health undergraduate degree, which is expected to launch in Fall 2022. 


One Health Case Study Leaders (Expert and OHSC Students)

Michelle Grundahl

Michelle is a graduate student in the Master of Biodefense program at George Mason University, Schar School of Policy and Government. Her interest is the interface of One Health and Biodefense. A few special interests include global health security (health systems preparedness, zoonotic emerging infectious diseases), bioterrorism, agroterrorism, food security and biosecurity. She has been managing animal disaster planning in the Pennsylvania Animal Response Team, and for the Philadelphia UASI region’s Southeastern Pennsylvania Regional Task Force (SEPA RTF) Health and Human Services (HHS) Mass Care group for the past decade. Michelle earned her BS in Animal Science (Animal Biotechnology) in 2002 from Delaware Valley University (Cum Laude). Since then, she has been employed in the contract research (CRO) industry providing business development (pharmaceutical/biotech/chemical/agriculture) and drug development services for preclinical animal toxicology and human clinical trials.

Grace Nichol

Hi everyone! My name is Grace Nichol (she/her) and I am the Junior Vice President of External Affairs for the OHSC. I am a first-year master’s student at OVC studying epidemiology, and I am also completing the Collaborative Specialization in One Health program. This is my first year on OHSC, and I have really enjoyed working with so many other students who are passionate about One Health! I love that collaboration is such a big part of One Health, and I think that taking a One Health approach will allow us to solve some of the big problems we are facing around the world. This is a picture of me with my dog, Gemma, and I also have a cat named Wilson!

Priya Jain

Hi everyone! My name is Priya Jain (she/her) and I am the Vice President of External Affairs for the OHSC. I am currently in my fourth year of my undergraduate studies in biomedical sciences and I am excited to be graduating this upcoming summer! I have been working with OHSC since Winter 2020 and have enjoyed meeting others that are passionate to be involved in events and research regarding One Health. Being part of the VPE team has introduced me to a huge network of individuals that have shown me how to be a better student, researcher and leader. When I am not attending OH related meetings or studying for school you can find me crocheting a new pair of socks!

Sydney Pearce

Hi everyone, my name is Sydney Pearce (she/her) and I’m the OHSC President! I founded OHSC back in fall 2019 and I’m doing my PhD in the Department of Population Medicine with the Collaborative Specialization in One Health. I’m passionate about One Health because its holistic, transdisciplinary nature can empower us to tackle many pressing issues affecting health, from climate change to food security, and encourages us to better understand and address the impact of inequities through research, practice, and advocacy. I also love that it allows me to engage with diverse communities and listen to so many important perspectives – it lets me explore fields that I didn’t go into but enjoy learning about! A fun fact about me is that I was on one of the U of G dance teams and cheer team (and *try to keep active with a local dance troupe online)!